Feed the world

Discover how our agricultural research is helping
to make chronic hunger and malnutrition a thing
of the past

The key issue: More people, less land for food production

Despite the significant progress made over the last two decades, more than 1 billion people around the world still go hungry, every day.


Still go hungry, everyday

Hunger and malnutrition are the number one risk to health worldwide - greater than AIDS,
malaria and tuberculosis combined, according to the World Food Program.

There are many factors at play

Increasing populations, decreasing farmlands,
and our changing climate. Nevertheless, the
planet has the capacity to produce enough
food for everyone – in theory.

It's our mission to make that a reality in practice.

What is UWA doing about this global issue?

Achieving food security and sustainability for all is at the heart of our agricultural research.

We’re improving productivity and adapting agriculture for our changing climate by harnessing everything from cutting-edge DNA technologies and cell biology research to biotechnology.

Our research focuses on
knowledge-informed agriculture

  • Smarter genetics
  • Better breeding of crops and
  • Innovative farming systems
  • Improved soil health management
  • Smarter irrigation technologies
  • Integrated land and water management
  • Rural and regional economics, policy
    and development

More Agriculture projects

Assoc. Prof. Megan Ryan

Novel strategies for remediation of oil spills using native plants and their rhizosphere microbes

Harnessing native Australian plants and their rhizosphere microbes to enhance breakdown of environmentally persistent petrogenic hydrocarbons (PHCs) from oil spills is the focus of this project (rhizo-remediation). Plant roots exude compounds which may aid breakdown of PHCs either directly, or indirectly through promoting growth of certain soil microbes.  The project…

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Michael Shane Senior Research Fellow

Metabolic adaptations of Hakea prostrata – a world champion of low phosphorus tolerance

Inorganic phosphate (Pi) is an essential macronutrient for all life, and vital for crop production. The flora in south-western Australia has evolved on some of the world’s most Pi-impoverished soils. This Kwongon region is a biodiversity hotspot of global significance, and the non-mycorrhizal plant family Proteaceae features prominently, particularly on…

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Dr Ken Flower

Impact of crop rotation in a no-tillage systems trial

Conservation agriculture (no-till) cropping systems have had major benefits for farmers, such as improved soil health, timeliness of sowing, moisture conservation and higher yields. The key components of this system are full crop residue (stubble) retention, diverse rotations and minimal soil disturbance. However, the recommendation for full residue retention is…

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